When Was the Anglo German Naval Agreement Signed

The Anglo-German Naval Agreement, also known as the German-British Naval Agreement, was signed on June 18, 1935. This agreement was signed between Nazi Germany and Great Britain in an effort to limit the naval arms race and to improve diplomatic relations between the two nations.

The signing of the Anglo-German Naval Agreement was a significant event in European history. The agreement allowed Germany to build its navy to 35% of the size of the British navy, with an agreement to not exceed this limit. This was a major win for Germany as it allowed them to rebuild their navy, which had been limited by the Treaty of Versailles following World War I. The agreement also allowed Germany to build submarines, which were banned by the Treaty of Versailles.

For Great Britain, the agreement was seen as a way to avoid the possibility of another war with Germany. The British government saw the agreement as a way to improve relations with Germany and prevent a repeat of the devastating conflict that had taken place just a few years earlier.

The signing of the Anglo-German Naval Agreement was met with mixed reactions. Many people in both Germany and Great Britain were supportive of the agreement and saw it as a way to avoid conflict. However, there were also many who opposed the agreement, arguing that it would only serve to strengthen Nazi Germany, which was already on the rise.

In the end, the Anglo-German Naval Agreement did little to prevent the outbreak of World War II. Germany continued to build its military, and by the start of the war in 1939, had already broken many of the terms of the agreement. However, the agreement remains an important historical event and is often cited as an example of the difficulties of appeasement in the face of aggressive expansionism.

In conclusion, the Anglo-German Naval Agreement was signed on June 18, 1935. While it was an attempt to limit the naval arms race and improve relations between Germany and Great Britain, ultimately, it did little to prevent the outbreak of the Second World War. However, it remains a significant event in European history and serves as a reminder of the dangers of appeasement in the face of aggressive expansionism.